10 Myths and Facts About Suicide

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Misconceptions about suicide are very much alive. They are dangerous as they stop us from recognising that someone may be at risk. Worse yet, they deter us from reaching out to provide crucial and necessary support, which can sometimes mean the difference between life and death.

Myth 1: Suicide is caused by depression

To say that depression is the cause of all suicides is a generalization repeated too often. Suicide is often due to a combination, sequence or repetition of distressing life events – depression may just be one of the many stressors a person is struggling with. Someone who isn’t depressed can still be at risk of suicide and not everyone suffering from depression dies by suicide.       

Myth 2: Only those acting moody and sad are suicidal

Suicide doesn’t have a ‘look.’ It can happen to anyone. Once someone has made concrete plans to suicide, they can become uncharacteristically happy or outgoing for reaching a decision. It is thus useful to take note of unusual emotional and behavioural changes in those around us. If your instinct tells you sometime is amiss, you may be right.

While attractive to believe, suicide doesn't have a look - it can happen to anyone.

Myth 3: Suicide is a rare occurrence and not a concern in Singapore

In Singapore, 429 lives were lost to suicide in 2016. Over the last five years, there have been 2.4 times as many suicides as transport accidents. Suicide is also the leading cause of death for those aged 10 – 29. Due to the difficulties in classifying a death as suicide, published statistics are almost always an under-estimate of the actual number. There are also many others who attempt suicide and this figure is even harder to accurately capture.

Myth 4: Suicides happen on impulse alone

Impulse plays some role in suicide – especially in youth, who may not yet be adept at processing and controlling emotions. At the same time, experience working with suicidal clients tells us that the process of suicide moves through stages such as ideation, gestures, plans, and attempts. While the act may seem sudden to by-standers, the decision to take one’s life is often developed over time and through deliberation.

For a decision which puts that much on the line, suicide isn’t an outcome the average person rushes in to.

Myth 5: People who talk about suicide or who have attempted before won’t actually go through with it

All suicide attempts should be treated as though the person has the intent to die. A prior suicide attempt may be a rehearsal or a cry for help from someone in profound distress. This should not be ignored or treated as a form of attention-seeking. Someone who is at risk of suicide will also display common warnings signs and risk factors.

Myth 6: Suicidal people want to die

Suicidal individuals are often ambivalent and fluctuate between wanting to live and wanting to die. For a person to contemplate suicide means they are in a situation of helplessness and despair. They want to get out of their situation but no longer know how to. Death seems like the only way out of their pain and suffering. Counselling, health, and mental health support thus play a critical role in recovery. 

Suicidal thoughts aren’t black and white – having them doesn’t mean someone wants to act on them.

Myth 7: There are no warning signs to suicide

Those contemplating suicide would often have communicated their intention. These signs may not always be direct or explicit as individuals fear being judged by those around them. The fact that you may not spot these warning signs doesn’t mean they don’t exist. It is therefore crucial to know some of the common warning signs and risk factors.

Myth 8: Asking someone about suicide encourages them to become suicidal

Asking someone if they are thinking about suicide doesn’t put the idea in their head; neither does it push them further towards suicide. Talking about suicide encourages them to do nothing more than to communicate, which is often the first step in getting them to live. For those contemplating suicide, it may also be a relief that someone is allowing them to verbalise a struggle they are facing. Asking about suicide shows that you care and want them to live.

 

Myth 9: Suicide only affects those from lower social economic backgrounds

The assumption here is that those with greater material wealth have lesser reason to take their own lives. However, the fact that celebrity suicides occur is the greatest evidence that this statement simply isn’t true. Globally, suicide is a public health concern which cuts across social economic statuses, with South Korea having one of the highest suicide rates in the developed world.

Myth 10: Suicide is hereditary

Suicide is a behavior, not a condition. While multiple suicides can be observed in some families, it isn't hereditary. Instead, those in the same family experience similar emotional and social environments. Coping methods and styles exhibited by some family members may also be imitated by others. Social learning is more often cited for multiple instances of suicide in the same family.

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